Carl Froch: and other Great British Lone Wolves

Hi, it’s Martin ‘Werewolfie’ Adams, sports correspondent at the Greenygrey. The killers of Lee Rigby continue to be called lone wolves, even though it’s becoming increasingly clear they were not acting alone; adding to the fact that there were two of them anyway!

If anyone was a lone wolf it was Lee Rigby, who was alone and defenceless against humans with lots of weapons.

Although this is trivial compared to Rigby’s loss, we believe we must try and lift gloom to spirit at the Greenygrey, and using humour is one way.

 Wolf Epithets are Usually Used Negatively 

Lone Wolf the Younger, Kiowa

Lone Wolf the Younger, Kiowa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wolf epithets are usually used negatively in modern monotheistic society, whereas in pagan societies they were considered an honour to be achieved.

She-wolves for competitive women is another one; as used by Helen Castor in a book about queens who fought for power; adapted to a BBC history series. Some strong ambitious women might hopefully look on it as a positive epithet though?

The same is true for lone-wolf. It could be used positively or negatively, but is usually used negatively; most often in terrorism cases these days it seems.

It could also be used for sportspeople, such as boxers and athletes, who have to train alone for long periods, and then try to outlast their opponents; as wolves often hunt by endurance.

British boxer Carl Froch

British boxer Carl Froch (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At the Greenygrey we like the wolf boxers rather than than the gazelles; and in athletics we like runners who lead from the front, reminiscent of endurance wolves rather than cheetah sprinters (we like gazelles and cheetahs too!).

Carl Froch and Amir Khan: Worthy of Wolfdom 

Carl Froch proved himself worthy of wolfdom last night when he wore down his opponent Mikkel Kessler, fighting more like a wolf than his original epithet of cobra. Kessler had won their first meeting in Denmark, and both fighters put on another great fight.

English: Amir Khan champion Boxer and future b...

English: Amir Khan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We particularly like Froch at the Greenygrey, because he looks quite wolflike, with his big eyes and big nose; like our ol’ pal Marc Latham. He also fights like a brave wolf, and diligently trains to keep himself at wolflike endurance.

We therefore bestow on Carl Froch the first Greenygrey honourable lone wolf name: Canis Froch. The scientific name for a wolf is canis lupus.

We also consider Amir Khan worthy of wolfdom, after doing Britain proud in the Athens 2004 Olympics, and having some great boxing battles in his professional career; and having a big nose. We bestow on him the honourable lone wolf name Amir Canis.

Paula Radcliffe and Kelly Holmes: Worthy of Wolfdom 

Radcliffe at the 2011 Berlin marathon.

Radcliffe at the 2011 Berlin marathon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For women worthy of wolfdom we must move to the sport of athletics, although Nicola Adams proved she had the potential to be a great she-lone-wolf at the London 2012 Olympics.

Paula Radcliffe never managed to win Olympic gold, but was a great runner who won the World Championships and broke the world record several times. She also  liked to lead from the front, wearing her opponents down with lone wolf endurance from early in a race. We bestow on her the honourable lone wolf name of Paula Radcanis.

And last but not least, Kelly Holmes liked to lead from the front going into the home straight, reminiscent of Cathy leading from the front as the Werewolf of Ozzers enter the final straight of their epic Ozyssey. We bestow on her the honourable lone wolf name of Kelly Dens.

Kelly on her lap of honour after winning the 1...

Kelly on her lap of honour after winning the 1500m final (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I hope none of them come hunting for my job now!

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One thought on “Carl Froch: and other Great British Lone Wolves

  1. Pingback: Good and Bad Everywhere: Dance if you Dare | greenygrey3

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